Chasing Colombia’s ‘Cocaine Hippos’ • Discoverology

Chasing Colombia’s ‘Cocaine Hippos’

After the Colombian National Police killed Escobar in 1993, zoos and private collectors acquired the animals, all except the hippopotamuses. They are only hippos in the wild outside Africa. Escobar started with four hippos. Today, a UC San Diego biologist estimates there are 80 to 100.

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