Before Tinder, There Was Dateline • Discoverology

Before Tinder, There Was Dateline

Operation Match was a computer dating service started at Harvard in 1965 by two undergraduates, that paired students together for dates for $3 a pop. Students filled in questionnaires which were processed by an IBM 1401 before receiving the names and telephone numbers of their matches in the post.

Related topics
Related posts
How To Persuade People To Change Their Behavior

How To Persuade People To Change Their Behavior

Explainers Life

Our innate anti-persuasion radar raises our defenses, so we avoid or ignore the message or, even worse, counter-argue. Rather than trying to persuade people, getting them to persuade themselves is often more effective. Here are three ways to do that.

You’re Tracked Everywhere You Go Online. Use This Guide to Fight Back.

You’re Tracked Everywhere You Go Online. Use This Guide to Fight Back.

Apps Tech

I recently did an online privacy checkup: Google was sharing my creditworthiness with third parties. If you would like Hearst, the publishing giant, to stop sharing your physical mailing address with third parties, you have to mail a physical letter with your request to the company’s lawyers.

Alcohol vs Drugs: Which Is More Dangerous?

Alcohol vs Drugs: Which Is More Dangerous?

Health Life Videos

The social drug of choice in Western culture is alcohol. Yet drinking is estimated to kill 100,000 a year in the UK alone. Should we wean ourselves off alcohol or even ban it, and instead promote other less harmful but currently illegal alternatives?

An Effortless Way to Improve Your Memory

An Effortless Way to Improve Your Memory

Life Psychology

New research suggests that we should aim for “minimal interference” during 10-15 minutes breaks – deliberately avoiding any activity that could tamper with the delicate task of memory formation. You really need to give your brain the chance for a complete recharge with no distractions.

How Millennials Became The Burnout Generation

How Millennials Became The Burnout Generation

Health Life Long Reads Psychology

We’re spoiled, entitled, lazy, and failures at what’s come to be known as “adulting,” a word invented by millennials as a catchall for the tasks of self-sufficient existence. I couldn’t figure out why small, straightforward tasks on my to-do list felt so impossible. The answer is both more complex and far simpler than I expected.

Meet The People Who Live A Low Carbon Life

Meet The People Who Live A Low Carbon Life

Life Nature

Some want a clear conscience. Others want to see if they are up to the challenge. But none of them want to wait until 2050 to cut their carbon emissions down to near-zero. Across the UK, environmentalists of all ages – from seven to 75 – are taking action now to lead low-carbon lives.

The Big Business Of Loneliness

The Big Business Of Loneliness

Business Innovation Life

Capitalism abhors a vacuum, and into this collective social void has stepped a fleet of companies and entrepreneurs selling an end to social isolation. Over the past decade, on-demand connection has become both a big business and a powerful marketing opportunity. 

When The iPhone Nearly Killed A Nation

When The iPhone Nearly Killed A Nation

History Tech Videos World

Nokia dominated the first decade of the cellphone boom, becoming a beloved brand around the world and pumping billions of dollars into the Finnish economy. Then, along came Steve Jobs and his iPhone in 2007 and ruined everything. Tens of thousands of jobs were lost. Nokia sold its phone business to Microsoft. And Finns took a serious hit to their country pride.

Iceland’s Big Bitcoin Heist

Iceland’s Big Bitcoin Heist

Business Crime Long Reads Tech

With its cheap geothermal energy and low crime rate, Iceland has become the world’s leading miner of digital currency. Then the crypto-crooks showed up. The thieves weren’t robbing banks. They were stealing the presses that print digital money.

Why Perfect Grades Don’t Matter

Why Perfect Grades Don’t Matter

Life Videos

Research shows that chasing after perfect grades discourages creativity and reduces academic risk-taking. The constant quest for perfect grades can lead to high stress and mental health problems. Here’s why good grades don’t always translate into success in life.

We Are Living In A Failed State

We Are Living In A Failed State

Life Politics

When the virus came here, it found a country with serious underlying conditions, and it exploited them ruthlessly. Chronic ills—a corrupt political class, a sclerotic bureaucracy, a heartless economy, a divided and distracted public—had gone untreated for years. We had learned to live, uncomfortably, with the symptoms.

Inside SpinLaunch, The Space Industry’s Best Kept Secret

Inside SpinLaunch, The Space Industry’s Best Kept Secret

Science Tech

Last summer, a secretive space company took up residence in a massive warehouse in the sun-soaked industrial neighborhood that surrounds Long Beach Airport. The company is building a massive centrifuge to accelerate rockets and send them screaming into space.

The Floating Utopia Of Salesforce Park

The Floating Utopia Of Salesforce Park

Architecture Cities Tech

Salesforce Park, in downtown San Francisco, sits atop the Salesforce Transit Center. It is a lush, five-and-a-half-acre rooftop arcadia of rolling meadows and meticulously landscaped, climatically harmonious, drought-tolerant flora. San Francisco’s newest public space reflects Big Tech’s influence—and a city’s anxieties.

Ed Smith And The Imagination Machine: The Untold Story Of A Black Video Game Pioneer

Ed Smith And The Imagination Machine: The Untold Story Of A Black Video Game Pioneer

History Tech

Thirty-seven years ago, New York-based APF Electronics, Inc. released The Imagination Machine. APF’s playful computer never rivaled the impact of products from Apple or Atari, but they remain historically important because of the man who co-created them: Ed Smith, one of the first African-American electronics engineers in the video game industry.

How The Dumb Design Of A WWII Plane Led To The Macintosh

How The Dumb Design Of A WWII Plane Led To The Macintosh

Design Explainers History Tech

For all the triumph of America’s new planes and tanks during World War II, a silent reaper stalked the battlefield: accidental deaths and mysterious crashes that no amount of training ever seemed to fix. At first, pilots took the blame for crashes. The true cause, however, lay with the design. That lesson led us into our user-friendly age—but there’s peril to come.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.